Matilda


Posted by khrishan on 2019-01-08

Matilda is the best film that was based on Roald Dahl's book. As good as the film is, I don't remember every reading the book – even though I have the book in my bookcase at home.

Roald Dahl, who wrote a whole series of children story books - most of which I read as a child. This post is part of the act of me 're-reading these books'.

Matilda is an extraordinary girl. Unfortunately, her family doesn't believe so. In all honestly, they think she's a waste of space.

Her brother was five years older than her, went to school, her Dad was a dodgy second car salesman and her mom spent most afternoons, playing bingo in a town eight miles away

At a young age, she became incredibly clever. This included teaching herself to read. When she was four, she was too young to go to school. So whilst her Mother went to play bingo, Matilda braved the ten minute walk to the local library.

After a few weeks, she had read every book in the children's section. So decided to start reading more complicated book, which are meant for adults - until she read every book in the library. This behaviour wasn't approved by her father. One evening, he pulled the book that Matilda was reading, and ripped it to pieces.

When she was five and a half, she was sent to school.

At school, Matilda becomes close to her teacher, Miss Honey, who is amazed by Matilda, and how smart she is. She tries to move her into a higher class but is refused by the brute of a headmistress, Agatha Trunchbull.

Miss Trunchbull terrorized her students with creative, over-the-top punishments to prevent parents from believing their children when they tell them what they endured. (Safe to say that there would be no place for a school like this these days :D).

When Matilda's friend, Lavender, plays a practical joke on Miss Trunchbull by placing a newt in her jug of water, Matilda uses an unexpected power of telekinesis to tip the glass of water containing the newt onto Miss Trunchbull.

After Matilda reveals her powers to Miss Honey, Miss Honey confides that she was raised by an abusive aunt after the suspicious death of her father. Her aunt is revealed to be Miss Trunchbull, who appears (among other misdeeds) to be withholding her niece's inheritance so that Miss Honey has to live in poverty in a derelict farm cottage.

With this new found knowledge, Matilda develops her telekinetic gift through practice at home. Later, during a lesson that Miss Trunchbull is teaching, Matilda telekinetically raises a piece of chalk to the blackboard and writes on it, posing as the spirit of Miss Honey's late father and demanding that Miss Trunchbull hand over Miss Honey's house and wages and leave the region forever.

With Miss Trunchbull's long gone, Matilda finds that she is no longer capable of telekinesis; this is explained by Miss Honey as the result of using her mind on a more challenging curriculum. Matilda continues to visit Miss Honey at her house regularly, but one day finds her parents and her older brother Michael hastily packing to escape from the police, who are after her father for selling stolen cars. Matilda asks permission to live with Miss Honey, to which her parents rather uninterestedly agree. So both she and Miss Honey find their happy ending.

References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matilda_(novel)